PART 1 OF RICK'S VINTAGE HOMES



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Street areas in this Vintage Home section include:
  • 2nd STREET - 15TH STREET AREAS
  • MAIN STREET AREA
  • WEST ISABELLE AREA
  • WEST ROSINE AREA
  • DEWEY AVENUE AREA

  • MAIN STREET



    1 2 3

    Circa 1861-1868
    FRANK SOMMER HOME
    The Cracker House
    914 Main Street
    This residence is a good example of the centered gabled ltalianate style. This style can be evidenced by the compound floor plan, front facing centered gable with prominent central extension below, large eaves with brackets dominating the cornice on the house, window crowns, large pane glazing in paired doors and the presence of a cupola on the house






    Circa 1866
    GUSTAVUS KOCH
    1023 Main Street
    NASH HOUSE
    1023 Main Street

    Angelo W. Powell, architect by attribution. Built this house in 1866 for Gustavus Koch, this well preserved Second Empire style residence features an exceptional concave polychromatic patterned Mansard roof



    WEST ISABELLE - NORTH ST JOSEPH AREA





    Circa 1960
    211 West Isabelle

    The wooden deck was added in 1960



    WEST ROSINE - NORTH ST JOSEPH AREA





    Circa 1910
    Charles Nowland Speculative House #9
    217½ West Rosine






    Circa 1903
    Charles Nowland Speculative House #15
    231 West Rosine
    Circa 1980
    Garage added
    231 West Rosine






    Circa 1901
    Charles Nowland Speculative House #14
    230-232 West Rosine



    2nd STREET AREA



    1 2 3 4 5 6 7

    Circa 1880
    Vosteen-Hauck House
    913 North 2nd Street

    The Vosteen-Hauck House, a late 19th century townhouse duplex constructed with attic and basement in the High Victorian Italianate style, is located in the city of St. Joseph, Missouri in an area of rapidly changing use. To the east lies an area of mixed residential and commercial use while to the south the factory of the Wire Rope Corporation of America sprawls, the construction of which obliterated all of the old neighborhood and the entire southern reach of Second Street. To the north are the remains of the Second Street neighborhood, a declining residential area. To the west, across Second Street, lies a vacant lot which will be drastically altered shortly by the creation of a massive ramp system for the newly constructed Interstate 229, further to the west.
    Jacob Hauck, businessman and founder of the Hauck Milling Company. This company operated on Second Street, next door to the Vosteen-Hauckh house @ 913 North 2nd street for 65 years from 1865 to its closing about 1930.
    In 1910 his mother -in -law Mrs Elizabeth Vosteen deeded her house on 2nd to her daughter and son in law, Millie and Charles Hauck who married in 1893. Charles was the son of Jacob Hauck who founded the Hauck Mill at the close of the civil war.
    The mill covered more than a ¼ block of land, built 1865, when it was first built it was called Excelsior Mill. Later George Hauck bought out his brother's interest and the Mill was organized under the name Hauck Milling Company.
    Erby Martin Felling worked @ Hauck Milling as a Miller per 1914 City Directory listing Son of Petronella Nellie Alders Felling.
    Some of the above information was supplied by Linda Alders
    The house and the store next door no longer exists
    The Wire Rope Corporation consumed the buildings



    4th STREET AREA





    Circa 1875
    Charles Scott House
    514 North 4th Street

    Two-story brick Italianate dwelling built in 1875, for Charles Scott, proprietor of the Gazette Job Printing Office. The residence features a rectangular shape with low hip roof and boxed and bracketed cornice, brick labeled segmental shaped lintels, and two-over-two light sash. A three-bay facade and a rear service wing with the original bracketed porch are also featured. The original facade porch has been removed.






    Circa 1875/1907 Altered
    Hiram Judd
    510 North 4th Street


    Two-story brick Italianate dwelling built in 1875 for Hiram Judd, a partner in a wholesale clothing company. It features a low hip roof with a boxed and bracketed cornice and segmental shaped and labeled brick lintels with keystone. On the south elevation is a deeply projecting tripartite two-story bay. A front porch was added in 1907.




    1 2 3 4 5 6 7

    Circa 1885
    Edmond Jacques Eckel House
    515 North 4th Street

    Edmond Jacques Eckel House is a historic home located at St. Joseph, Missouri. It was designed by the architect Edmond Jacques Eckel (1845–1934) and built in 1885. It is a 2 1/2-story, brick dwelling with a truncated hipped roof. It measures 25 feet wide and 36 feet deep. It features a small, flat roofed, wood entrance portico with Tuscan order columns.
    It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980.
    It is located in the Robidoux Hill Historic District.






    Circa 1880
    Walter Sanders House
    611 North 4th Street

    Single-story brick dwelling built in 1880 in the Italianate style for Walter Sanders, son of a stove and tinware shop owner. It has a truncated hip roof with boxed cornice and has a two-bay facade. The first bay is dominated by a chamfer-shaped bay window of frame construction featuring segmental arched window bays in all three facets. Projecting brick segmental shaped and labeled lintels are found over the second bay entry.
    The original porch has been removed.






    Circa 1882
    615-617 North 4th Street

    In the middle of the photo




    1 2

    619 NORTH 4th Street

    Before and after - mid 1990's and April 2015
    Rusty Countryman once lived in this when it was a duplex (photo #1)
    In the 1990's, the owner purchased & remodeled this building
    Photo #2 show what the building now looks like
    He did an incredible job remodeling it



    5th STREET AREA





    Edward Schram House
    702 North 5th Street






    5th Street & Louis






    503 ANTOINE






    504 ANTOINE






    5th & ISADORE






    5th & ISADORE






    5th & ISADORE






    503 NORTH 5th STREET






    515 NORTH 5th STREET




    1 2 3

    Circa 1871
    JOHN C. LEMON MANSION
    517 NORTH 5th STREET




    1 2

    THE STUDEBAKER HOUSE
    603 NORTH 5th STREET






    624 NORTH 5th STREET




    1 2 3

    724 NORTH 5th STREET



    6th STREET AREA



    1 2 3 4 5

    624 NORTH 6th Street






    HOPE HOUSE
    SOUTH OF HALL



    7th STREET AREA





    Circa 1880
    Karl Schatz House
    518 North 7th Street
    Circa 1909
    Henry Groneweg House
    518 North 7th Street

    Henry Groneweg, who was a pioneer cigar and tobacco merchant in St. Joseph, was born in 1821 in Hanover, Germany. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1848 and arrived in St. Joseph in 1852. Organized in 1853, his business was known as the Henry Groneweg Cigar and-Tobacco Co., and later it became the St. Joseph Tobacco Co., which is still in existence, but is no longer a manufacturing firm.
    The cigar manufacturing business was an important one in the latter half of the 19th and early part of the 20th century in St. Joseph, and was primarily operated by persons of German extraction. Mr. Groneweg purchased the home at 518 N. 7th between 1909 and 1912 and lived there until his death.
    This is a brick structure built circa 1880 in an Italianate style. A deep horizontal cornice overhangs the front building line, and below the cornice is a frieze with dentils. The one story raised porch has an entablature with an applied saw-tooth motif in the frieze. Its roof is supported on paired chamfered columns with car penter detailing at the base and capitals. The porch rail is supported by scroll-work balusters. Window openings on the main facade have arched hoods of raised brick with label stops, which end at the impost level.






    Circa 1910
    Rolanda Court Apartments
    602 North 7th Street

    The Rolanda Court Apartments, 602 N. 7th, were built Circa 1910 as a duplex and have been converted to eight apartments. The eclectic mixture of motifs on what is essentially a symmetrical Georgian Revival facade has witnessed little alteration over the years. The exterior is unchanged except for removal of a cornice. The rusticated stone quoins are very pronounced as well as the pediments of the central bay of the main facade on the 1st and 2nd levels. The pediment on the second story shows paired Italianate brackets beneath the cornice. This pediment and cornice have a carved motif in the dentil band. The pediment over the porch has imbricated shingles, typical of the Queen Anne Style, and a denticulated raking cornice. The porch roof is supported on Tuscan columns. The High Victorian Italianate window and door hoods have projecting key stones; all are embellished with intaglio carving, and corbelled label stops.






    Circa 1870s
    Finis & Claribel Albright McClain House
    610 North 7th Street

    The Finis and Claribel Albright McClain House, 610 N. 7th, was built during the 1870's and has been converted to apartments. The attenuated paired window openings have wood entablature heads. The building has been covered with composition siding that gives it a vernacular appearance. The porch, which wraps around the east and south first story facades, is supported by Tuscan columns and has a pediment which defines the entrance. A transom with side lights surrounds the main entrance. The dominant pro jecting cornice at the eave may originally have been supported by modillions or brackets.






    Circa 1870s
    Finis & Claribel Albright McClain House
    610½ North 7th Street

    A small, non-conforming building at the rear of the lot.






    Circa 1870s
    Chase-McClain House
    614 North 7th Street

    George Washington Chase, builder of the house at 614 N. 7th, was the founder of the Chase Candy Company. A native of Vermont, he came to St. Joseph in 1877, and joined a firm of fruit merchants and confectioners on Market Square.
    He became senior partner sometime later and the business was later run by his son, Ernest, and his grandson, Charles. The business was sold by family interest in 1943, but continues in operation to this day under the name of Chase Candy Co., and still produces the famous Cherry Mash candy bar.
    The Chase-McClain House, 614 N. 7th, a Second Empire style residence for the 1870's, was built for Dr. George Washington Chase, the founder of the Chase Candy Company. Although it is not a mansion in size, it was constructed as a stately residence with many special architectural features. Projecting from the mansard roof, the wall dormers on the second story are covered by either semi-circular hoods or triangular pediments, with engaged pilasters flanking the windows. The windows are four over four light and appear to be original.
    On the first story there is a bay window on the east side of the house. The main roof and the bay window cornices contain heavily detailed brackets. The windows in the bay, which are attenuated and form an arcade motif, are separated by cabled, engaged columns with a panelled frieze above. The small raised one story porch on the south side is supported by one Tuscan column and has dentils be neath the cornice.






    Circa 1870
    John Forest Martie House
    624 North 7th Street

    The John Forest Martie House, 624 N. 7th, is a remodeled Italianate structure from circa 1870, which has been converted from a single family dwelling to an apartment complex. It originally had very decorative arched lintels, but these were covered with stucco, leaving only the keystone in each segmental arch visible. The boxed cornice has paired decorative brackets. Supported by columns, the small pedimented porch roof with striking returns covers an entrance which has a stained glass transom and the original door and lock. Besides this obviously later addition, there appears to be an addition on the south side of the house, but it is covered with stucco and is therefore not prominent, and an alteration on the northeast corner of the house to form an exterior apart ment entrance. The window openings are all 9 over 1 except for a large oval beveled glass window with a semi-circular head on the north facade at the landing level of the stairs. On the interior, the chandeliers are original and the four fireplaces have their original mantels






    Circa 1890
    Oak Ridge Apartments
    702-704 North 7th Street

    The Oak Ridge Apartments. 702-704 North 7th, a vernacular style building, were constructed in 1890. The alterations to the house include an addition on the rear and composition siding on the exterior. The windows are six over one and have wooden surrounds. The raised one story porch, extending the length of the main facade, is supported by panelled rectangular columns






    Circa 1870s
    C.D. Smith-Catholic Chancery-Wright Nursing Home
    718 North 7th Street

    The C.D. Smith - Catholic Chancery - Wright Nursing Home, 718 N. 7th, is an Italianate style residence, built by C.D. Smith, a wholesale druggist. Prominent exterior features include a wide cornice and deep, heavily band ed, fascia. Elaborate scroll work brackets support the cornice, com plemented by smaller scroll-like modillions. There are two story bay windows on the north and south facades. Openings include semi-circular, segmental, or flat-topped arches,and all are surmounted by hoodmolds of raised brick. Projecting keystones are of carved stone. The chimneys feature raised panels of brick below belt courses. A large porch, which curves around the northeast corner of the structure is supported by paired Romanesque columns with terra cotta capitals. These columns rest on brick piers with open brickwork forming the balustrade. The stairways and millwork of the interior have not been altered






    Close to 7th & HALL



    8th STREET AREA





    Hilen Ketcham House
    603-605 NORTH 8th Street

    Mr. Ketcham was a Market Square merchant from before the War between the States until the late 1880's, dealing in queensware and china on the NW corner of 2nd and Felix. He was,for a short while, a partner with Adam Schuster, and was the brother-in-law of Edwin Horton whose 1860 frame home in the Museum Hill area of St. Joseph is currently being restored. His residence was at the corner of 7th and Felix where the German American Bank now stands, until he built the house at 603-605 N. 8th. One daughter married Dr. Charles Wallace; the other married Robert Orr, a partner in C.D. Smith Drug Company.






    Circa 1905
    E. H. Lindsay Duplex
    639-641 North 8th Street

    The E.H. Lindsay Duplex, 639-641 N. 8th, was built in 1905 in the typical Box form for Ernest M. Lindsay. On the west facade, three dormers, projecting from the bellcast hip roof, have alternating hip-pediment-hiproofs. The enclosed porch at the second story is an addition. The one story porch extending the length of the residence is now supported on brick columns. There is evidence that they were originally Ionic columns. A wide plain frieze and architrave accentuate the porch and eave line. Leaded glass is used in some window transoms.






    Circa 1905
    E. H. Lindsay Duplex
    635-637 North 8th Street

    The E.H Lindsay Duplex. 635-637 N. 8th, built in 1905 shows some 'similarities' to its neighbor due to the fact that the contractor, D. D. Semple, was the same for both structures. Here, however, the asymmetrical facade of this duplex is accentuated by the Flemish gable wall dormer on the west facade which has an ornate parapet. A second story oval window is embellished with exaggerated keystones on cross axis. Alterations to the structure include the enclosed porch at the second story and the enclosure of part of the first story porch. This porch is supported by both Doric columns and rectangular brick columns.






    Circa 1894
    Ketcham-Wallace-Orr-Ide House
    603-605 North 8th Street

    The Ketcham-Wallace-Orr-Ide House, 603-605 N. 8th, is an example of the eclecticism of this period. Built in 1894 by Mr. Ketcham, its predominant motifs are from the Georgian Revival style. The palladian window in the projecting central bay has brick surrounds; other windows have soldier arches. The two eyebrow dormers call attention to the pediment, in the middle of which is an elliptical window with star-shaped muntins.
    The pediment is covered with wood shingles and has brackets in the raking cornice. Asymmetry is introduced by the two story bay window that forms the southwest third of the main facade. The porch, running the full length of the main facade, is supported by paired Tuscan columns. A wide plain frieze and architrave are predominant at the porch and eave line
    A barn to the east of the residence has been converted to a three car garage and is a non-conforming structure.






    Circa 1888
    Herschel Bartlett-Parker House
    537 North 8th Street

    Mr. Herschel Bartlett commissioned Eckel and Mann to build a home at 537 N. 8th in 1888. A large single window in the stairwell of this home is thought to be of Paul H. Wolff's design, before he established his own business. Mr. Bartlett arrived in St. Joseph in 1862 along with his three brothers. To gether they formed the Bartlett Brothers Mortgage Company. They built the firm into the largest farm mortgage business in the area by bringing Eastern capital into the St. Joseph agricultural area.
    The Herschel Bartlett - Parker House. 537 N. 8th, was built in 1888 and designed by Harvey Ellis. Irregularity of plan and massing, and variety of color and texture characterize this Queen Anne house. There is a great deal of terra cotta decorative trim used in the belt course of the tower, as well as under the cornice. This rich trim is also found around windows, on the chimneys, and as panels on the tower. The chimneys are tall with elaborate decoration, including corbelled brickwork.
    The projecting gables at attic level have wood ornamentation, imitative of naif timbering, and are supported by fan brackets. A bay window sits below each of these gables. There is an octagonal tower on the southwest corner capped with a steeply pitched roof and a small copper finial similar to the one which tops the hip roof over the main block of the residence.
    The front porch has a small pediment with terra cotta detailing over the main entrance, and is supported by Tuscan columns which rest on brick pedestals. A large two story carriage house with the same materials sits at the rear of the lot, east of the residence.






    Circa 1863
    Askin House
    527-529 North 8th Street

    The Askin House. 527-529 N. 8th, has had few changes since its con struction in 1863; only a small room added to the rear. The shutters are new, but duplicate those as shown in an earlier photo of the residence. Each window is topped by brick, segmental headers. The small pedimented, neo-classical porches on the west facade are supported by Tuscan columns and protect the entrances which have transoms and side lights. There is an eyebrow window in the truncated hip roof. The high banked yard is retained by a field stone wall.






    Circa 1900
    Gotz House
    528-530 North 8th Street

    The Gotz House, 528-530 N. 8th, is a remodeled brick Italianate style structure built circa 1900, which has been converted into apartments. This house has quoins made of raised brick and a plain boxed cornice with paired brackets which overlap the architrave molding, located periodic ally along the roof line. Topped by heavy hoods with decorative key stones, raised moldings, and corbelled stops, the windows are attenuated and have lugsills supported by small scroll brackets. The two front porches have elaborate carpenter scroll work friezes as well as dentils at the first and second story roof lines. These porches are supported by decorative engaged columns along the walls, but have plain rectangular columns at the free standing corners, which might indicate an alteration.






    Circa 1908
    Missouri Methodist Hospital-Huggins House
    600 North 8th Street

    Missouri Methodist Hospital - Huggins House, 600 N. 8th, is an eclectic style Box form house with Classical Revival decorative elements construct ed around 1908. The roof of this house has triangular pedimented dormers with pilasters. Each dormer has a set of paired windows and double half circle decorative moldings above the windows. Segmental brick arches with cutstone skewbacks top the windows of the first and second story windows; the double windows also have decorative keystones and mullions. An accentuated string course connects the window hoods in the second story accomplished by the use of a sawtooth brick pattern. Corbelled brickwork appears under the eaves. The porch entablature, complete with dentils and a wide plain frieze is supported by Ionic columns set in pairs. The porch wraps around the southeast corner of the structure. There is a transom over the double front door and some stained glass used in the windows of the first story.






    Circa 1908
    Missouri Methodist Hospital-Dr. Williams House
    602-604 North 8th Street

    Missouri Methodist Hospital-Dr. Williams House, 602-604 N. 8th, is a 1908 Queen Anne style house which has had extensive exterior alterations. In covering the exterior with aluminum siding, most of the decorative details were hidden. There is a tower, with a conical roof topped with a finial, on the northeast corner of the residence, with an open porch on the third story. One side porch still retains its ornate quality with turned columns supporting the roof; another shows scroll-work brackets. There are stained glass transoms above the attenuated windows on the first story.






    Circa 1870
    W. N. Bartlett-Potter House
    610 North 8th Street

    W. N. Bartlett-Potter House, 610 N. 8th, is a Federal Revival style residence built in 1870. The facade is symmetrical under a gable roof. A cross gable intersecting roof has a tri-part attic window with a pent roof intersecting the gable face. The main gable of the house covers a projecting two story bay on the north. Located in a one story projecting porch, the entrance, flanked by side-lights surmounted by an elliptical transom with radiating muntins, creates a vestibule. The windows are slightly attenuated and wooden surrounds with entablatured wood lintels. The house has been covered by asbestos siding






    Circa 1880s
    Lamantja House
    624 North 8th Street

    The Lamantja House, 624 N. 8th, is a frame house built in the 1880's. The residence is an asymmetric vernacular building with very little architectural detailing. A two story gable faces the street. Entrance is from a one story side porch supported by Tuscan columns into a one story gable roofed addition with a shed roofed lean-to. The variant window trims at the single story ell and the pent roof at the rear in dicate probable additions. The house is covered with asbestos siding




    1 2 3 4

    Circa 1907
    Enright House
    630 North 8th Street

    The Enright House, 630 N. 8th, is a Classical Box style with Colonial Revival motifs. Built in 1907, the residence has a near symmetric facade under a hip roof. The single, centered dormer has a classical pediment over millwork details which simulate columns and an entablature.
    All major wall openings fn the main facade are divided into a large center light flanked by narrow side-lights, separated by attenuated engaged Tuscan columns supporting an entablature under the transoms. Side lights have round headed upper sashes; transoms are filled with a dia mond shaped design formed by curvilinear muntins. The one story porch, which extends the full length of the main facade and is topped by a wooden balustrade, repeats the classical motifs of the Tuscan columns and entablature
    A one story brick carriage house has been converted to a two car garage and an apartment above. The building is capped by a mansard roof with hip roof dormers projecting on several sides. There is one pent roofed dormer at the landing level of the stairs. Openings on the first story have brick soldier course lintels. This structure sits to the north and west of the residence.



    9th STREET AREA





    Circa 1883
    700-702 North 9th Street

    Ninth Street was still ungraded in 1868 as shown on a map of that year. This building was most likely constructed in 1883 when the water permit was taken out on this property by Fred Priebe. Mr. Priebe was a bookkeeper for the wholesale hardware company of J. H. Robinson. Neither Priebe nor Robison resided here.
    This building retains it's original cornice, window treatment and massing which would render it significantly as a oontributing memmber of a potential annex to the Hall Street Historic District.
    It once sat on the southwest corner of 9th & Hall Street
    This duplex no longer exists, it is now just a vacant grassy lot




    1 2

    Circa 1880
    644-646 North 9th Street

    Ninth street was still ungraded in 1868 as shown on a map of that year. The duplex was probably constructed in 1880 when a water permit was taken out on the property. The name on the permit was A. E. Hove who did not reside here, so it was most likely built as an investment.
    The Italianate roofline and massing, aa well as the handsome double baluatraded front porch renders this building a strongly contributing member of potential annex to the Hall street Historic District.
    This duplex no longer exists, it is now just a vacant grassy lot
    All houses in this block on west side of street are now gone






    Circa 1951
    631 North 9th Street

    One-story, three-bay, frame cottage with Minimal Traditional influence, built 1951. Gable-front roof covered with asphalt shingles, with flush eaves. Exterior walls covered with vinyl siding. Windows are 2/2 double-hung sashes. One-bay, shed-roofed porch supported by wrought iron posts. Entrance contains a three-light, six-panel replacement door.






    Circa 1875
    927 Ridenbaugh Street

    Two-story, three-bay, brick masonry and frame side hall townhouse, built in 1875 as a one-story cottage with Italianate influence, and altered with a second floor frame addition with Queen Anne influence in 1900. Gable-front roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice and closed gable end decorated with fish scale, sawtooth and scallop shingles. Upper exterior walls covered with weatherboard siding. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some in pairs or groups of three; first floor windows have corbeled segmental-arched lintels with palmetto-motif keystones. Full-width, shed-roofed porch supported by Doric columns. Entrance contains a single-light replacement door topped by an obscured transom.






    Circa 1872
    Clarkson Foote House
    902 North 9th Street

    Two-story, four-bay, frame house with Italianate influence, built in 1872. Flat and hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice and frieze board. Facade features second story, projecting comer box bay set at an angle above a larger, first story, projecting box bay; side facade features tow, projecting polygonal bays. Exterior walls covered with weatherboard siding. Windows are 1/1 and 2/2 double-hung sashes set in segmental-arched molded lintels with labels and back band surround. Partial-width, shed-roofed porch supported by Doric columns spanned by an arched, paneled frieze. Entrance contains a multilight door topped with a single-light transom and flanked by 3/4-length sidelights






    Circa 1906
    918-920 POWELL

    Brick Duplex Two-story, seven bay, brick duplex with Queen Anne and Colonial Revival influence, built in 1906. Complex hip and gable roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice, cornice returns, verge board with peak pendants, gable roofed dormers with 1/1 double-hung sashes, and gable end containing a Gothic-arched double-hung sash with tracery in top sash. Facade has a projecting, twostory, polygonal bay covered with a hip roof. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some with segmental-arched, corbeled brick hoods. Partial-width, partially-undercut porch has flat roof and added metal shed awning on second floor level, all supported by wrought iron replacement posts. Two entrances contain an oval light door and a solid replacement door.




    1 2

    907-911 DEWEY AVENUE







    509-511 NORTH 9th STREET

    This Duplex no longer exists






    609-611 NORTH 9th STREET

    This Duplex no longer exists, a very large cement parking lot replaced it






    613-615 NORTH 9th STREET

    This Duplex still exists






    617-619 NORTH 9th STREET

    This Duplex still exists






    620 NORTH 9th STREET

    This building no longer exists, just a vacant grassy lot
    All houses in this block on west side of street are gone






    621 NORTH 9th STREET

    This building still exists






    622 NORTH 9th STREET

    This building no longer exists, just a vacant grassy lot
    All houses in this block on west side of street are gone






    623-627 NORTH 9th STREET

    This building still exists, it now has trees in front of it
    It looks much better than this photo now






    638-640 NORTH 9th STREET

    This duplex no longer exists, it is now just a vacant grassy lot
    All houses in this block on west side of street are gone



    CHURCH STREET INTERSECTS & ENDS AT 9th STREET





    701-703 NORTH 9th STREET

    This duplex still exists, it sits on the corner of 9th & Church Street






    707 NORTH 9th STREET

    This house still exists, trees cover the front of the house



    HALL STREET INTERSECTS & BEGINS AT 9th STREET





    802 NORTH 9th STREET

    This house still exists, the house has 2 entrances with sidewalks
    One sidewalk leads to Hall and the other leads to 9th Street






    818-820 NORTH 9th STREET

    This duplex still exists, it appears to be needing a paint job




    1 2 3 4

    819-821 NORTH 9th STREET

    This duplex still exists but is very poor condition
    Photo #2 - submitted by Charlotte Carpenter
    Photo #3 - submitted by Charlotte Carpenter
    Photo #4 - submitted by Charlotte Carpenter






    822-824 NORTH 9th STREET

    This house still exists, appears to be in great condition
    Sits on the corner of 9th & Ridenbaugh



    RIDENBAUGH STREET STARTS AT 9th STREET HEADING EAST





    823-825 NORTH 9th STREET

    This duplex is gone, an empty grass lot only remains
    Used to sit on the southeast corner of 9th & Ridenbaugh






    646 NORTH 9th

    This duplex is gone, an empty grass lot only remains
    Used to sit on the southeast corner of 9th & Ridenbaugh



    CHARLES STREET INTERSECTS





    302 South 9th Street

    The house is gone, currently a parking lot for the US Post Office






    306 South 9th Street

    The house is gone, currently a parking lot for the US Post Office






    307 South 9th Street

    The house still exists in 2017






    310 South 9th Street

    The house is gone, currently an empty grassy lot






    315 South 9th Street

    The house is gone, currently a parking lot



    SYLVANIE STREET INTERSECTS



    1 2 3 4 5 6

    J. B. MOSS HOUSE
    906 Sylvanie

    J. B. Moss house, now Barbosa's Castillo
    Located on the southeast corner of 9th & Sylvanie
    They come from all over the world for this great Mexican food
    Entrance to the restaurant is in the rear where a parking lot exists
    They currently have two locations, one downtown and one on Frederick Avenue




    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

    Charles A. and Annie Buddy House
    424 South 9th Street

    The Charles A. and Annie Buddy House is located on the northwest corner of South 9th and Angelique Streets near downtown St. Joseph. The house just to the north at 412 South 9th Street was built the same year as the Buddy House. The house at 418 South 9th was demolished in 1986, and the lot has been used as a fenced garden for 412. Across the street to the north are well-preserved buildings in the Museum Hill National Register District. The spires of the historic Queen of the Apostles Roman Catholic Church can be seen to the east






    1 2 3

    602-604 South 9th Street




    1

    618-620 South 9th Street



    10th STREET AREA



    1

    1013-1015 Vine





    Circa 1851
    Alois Herbert Double House
    620 South 10th Street

    The Alois Herbert Double House at 620 South loth Street is locally significant under C in the area of ARCHITECTURE. This building is representative of the growth of St. Joseph's entrepreneurs' success and their building of residences away from the city center in the hills overlooking the original town plat. Alois Herbert immigrated to America from Bavaria and was a boot and shoemaker by trade. Having been successful in his profession, Alois Herbert moved to Saint Joseph and was able to build himself a one-and-a-half story brick double house in 1851. His ability to build this house is also significant of a working class tradesman who had the disposable income to construct and own income-producing property. The Alois Herbert Double House is also as an example of the Property Type: Greek Revival. This building is a good example of the Greek Revival style in St. Joseph. The Period of Significance of the Alois Herbert Double House is 1851, the date of construction.







    Circa 1905
    Hose Company #7
    1007 North 10th Street

    Two-story, two-bay, frame side hall townhouse with Colonial Revival influence, built 1905. Gable-front roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice and cornice returns. Exterior walls covered with asbestos shingles. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some in groups of three. Full-width, hip-roofed porch supported by wrought iron replacement posts. Entrance contains a multi-light door topped with a single-light transom.






    Circa 1905
    Mrs. S. Owen House
    1013 Ridenbaugh

    Two-story, two-bay, frame side hall townhouse with Colonial Revival influence, built 1905. Gable-front roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice and cornice returns. Exterior walls covered with asbestos shingles. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some in groups of three. Full-width, hip-roofed porch supported by wrought iron replacement posts. Entrance contains a multi-light door topped with a single-light transom.




    1 2 3 4 5

    Joshua Motter House
    301 South 10th Street

    The mansion has burned down
    The carriage house remains, it has been made into apartments

    Photo #1 submitted by Michael Miller






    1017-1019 Powell







    Circa 1905
    1114 Powell

    Two-story, two-bay, frame Queen Anne house with Queen Anne and Colonial Revival influences, built ca. 1905. Gable and hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with a box cornice. Exterior walls covered with vinyl siding. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some in pairs or groups of three. Fullwidth, hip-roofed porch supported by wrought iron replacement posts. Entrance contains a single-light replacement door.







    416 South 10th Street








    507 South 10th Street








    509 South 10th Street








    511 South 10th Street





    1 2

    610 SOUTH 10th STREET






    624 SOUTH 10th STREET




    1 2

    Joseph Grief House
    719-721 SOUTH 10th STREET






    1019 SOUTH 10th STREET






    1022 SOUTH 10th STREET






    1206 SOUTH 10th STREET






    1208 SOUTH 10th STREET






    1210 SOUTH 10th STREET






    1219 SOUTH 10th STREET






    10th & EDMOND STREET

    Looking west on Edmond Street between 10th & 11th Street

    Photo submitted by Michael Miller






    10th & CHARLES STREET

    Looking west on Charles Street between 10th & 11th Street

    Photo submitted by Michael Miller






    10th & ANGELIQUE STREET




    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12

    Circa 1859
    Burnside-Sandusky Gothic House
    720 South 10th Street

    The Burnside-Sandusky Gothic House is located at 720 South 10lh Street in St. Joseph. South 10th Street is located just southeast of downtown St. Joseph, and is part of a mature residential neighborhood. The neighborhood developed as a mixture of single-family and multi-family residences, built primarily during the period 1859 through 1930. The 700 block of South 10th Street reflects the area's diversity of architectural styles, including Gothic Revival, Italianate, Queen Anne and Craftsman examples. Regardless of building type and architectural style, buildings along the street have a notably uniform setback of twenty feet from the sidewalk and thirty feet from the curb. The street right-of-way in this block includes wide concrete sidewalks, planting strips with mature street trees, and a stone curb. There is no indication that the setting has changed appreciably since the house's period of significance.






    Circa 1887
    Louis Stigers House
    1023 Church Street

    Two-story, three-bay, brick masonry townhouse with Queen Anne influence, built 1887. Flat and hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice, cornice gutters and corbeled frieze. Facade features corner square tower with pyramidal roof covered with polychrome hexagonal slates and wrought iron finial. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes with incised stone lintels, and 1/1 double-hung sashes topped with fixed-sash stained glass transoms. Full-width, L-plan, flat and hip roofed porch supported by turned posts with a turned spindle frieze. Entrance contains a single-light, single-panel door topped with a singlelight transom.






    514 NORTH 10th STREET



    Circa 1901 Virginia Flats - 516-518 North 10th Street

    1 2 3

    Circa 1888 Virginia Flats - 520-528 North 10th Street


    1 2 3 4 5 6

    Circa 1901
    VIRGINIA FLATS
    aka Summit Place Flats
    516-518 NORTH 10th STREET
    Circa 1888
    VIRGINIA FLATS
    aka Summit Place Flats
    520-528 NORTH 10th STREET

    The Virginia Flats are two apartment buildings, historically associated, sitting adjacent on N. 10th Street in St. Joseph, Buchanan County, Missouri. The south building, 516-518 N. 10th, is a two-story, rectangular four-plex executed in the Colonial Revival style. The hipped roof structure has a full-length, onestory front porch. The north building, 520-528 N. 10th Street, is a larger two-story rectangular structure. The Queen Anne style apartment building contains fourteen apartments, seven on each floor.
    516-518 N. 10th Street is a two-story, brick rectangular fourplex with a brick foundation. It was constructed in 1901, and contains references to a prevalent architectural style of the period - the Colonial Revival style.
    520-528 N. 10th Street was designed by the prominent St. Joseph architectural firm of Eckel and Mann in 1888. It is a two-story, brick rectangular building with a brick foundation executed in the Queen Anne style. The red brick on the front (east) elevation is set in running bond, but on the rear and south in common bond. The brick on the north elevation has been covered with stucco.






    519 NORTH 10th STREET






    602 NORTH 10th STREET






    606-608 NORTH 10th STREET






    607 NORTH 10th STREET






    607-609 NORTH 10th STREET






    611-613 NORTH 10th STREET






    612-614 NORTH 10th STREET






    615-617 NORTH 10th STREET






    616-618 NORTH 10th STREET






    701-703 NORTH 10th STREET






    702 NORTH 10th STREET






    704 NORTH 10th STREET






    705-707 NORTH 10th STREET






    708 NORTH 10th STREET






    709-711 NORTH 10th STREET






    713-715 NORTH 10th STREET




    1 2

    Circa 1910
    Mrs. J. Gleason Duplex
    714-716 North 10th Street

    Two-story, three-bay, brick masonry duplex with Craftsman influence, built 1910. Flat roof covered with built-up asphalt roofing, with plain stone coping, segmental-arched parapet, modillion corbeled cornice and delineated sign panel. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some in pairs. Full-width, hip-roofed porch supported by brick piers on brick bases with a block spindle balustrade. Entrance contains a single-light, single-panel door, topped with a single-light transom.






    717 NORTH 10th STREET






    720 NORTH 10th STREET






    721-723 NORTH 10th STREET






    722 NORTH 10th STREET






    801 NORTH 10th STREET






    804 NORTH 10th STREET






    805 NORTH 10th STREET






    806 NORTH 10th STREET






    807-809 NORTH 10th STREET






    808 NORTH 10th STREET






    810 NORTH 10th STREET






    811-813 NORTH 10th STREET






    814-816 NORTH 10th STREET






    Circa 1880
    1027 Henry Street

    Two-story, three-bay, brick masonry side hall townhouse with Italianate influence, built in 1880. Flat and Hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with bracketed box cornice, cornice gutters and corbeled frieze. Windows are 2/2 double-hung sashes, some in pairs and some with segmental-arched corbeled lintels. Entrance contains a single-light, eight-panel replacement door, topped with a two-light transom.



    11th STREET AREA





    1113 Penn Street
    At Right Side of Photo
    1103 Penn Street
    At Left Side of Photo






    1107 South 11th Street
    At Left Side of Photo
    1115 South 11th Street
    At Right Side of Photo






    1101 South 11th Street






    1115 Lafayette Street
    On the Left
    1123 Lafayette Street
    On the Right






    1124 Lafayette Street
    On the Left
    1116 Lafayette Street
    On the Far Right




    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35

    Circa 1847
    "MAPLE GROVE"
    Joseph Davis House
    2100 North 11th Street

    "Maple Grove" is located in north St. Joseph, Missouri. The house, which faces west, overlooks the Great Western Savannah Railroad tracks and a light industrial/commercial business district. Architecturally insignificant, twentieth-century, residential neighborhoods surround the house on the south, east, and north.
    "Maple Grove" (Joseph Davis House), 2100 North Eleventh Street, St. Joseph, Missouri, is signficant as a residential building in a typical Missouri, Classically derived style, maintained in near original condition, in its locale. Serving as the home of one of St. Joseph's early pioneer families, "Maple Grove" may be one of the earliest surviving brick, private dwellings in the city.
    Previous owners:
    A chronology of ownership includes:
    1) Joseph Davis 1847 to 1889
    2) ? (Davis will in probate) 1889 to 1900
    3} Richard Davis (son of Joseph Davis) 1900 to 1900
    4) two unknown owners 1900 to 1901
    5) Fred M. Smith 1901 to 1938
    6) rental property -- 1938 to 1944
    7) John Covey 1944 to 1947
    8) Walter and Alta Ruark 1947 to 1968
    9) Charles and Sue Hagee 1968 to present
    Photo #1 - Interior view showing the southeast corner of the first-floor bedroom. The dado panels under the win dows match those found in the parlor; the clothes press (original to the parlor) is typical of those found in each second-floor bedroom. The room's out standing feature is the Adamesque-style fireplace mantel






    Circa 1889
    Alice Ferguson Duplex
    1101-1103 Church Street

    Two and one-half story, six-bay, brick masonry duplex townhouse with Queen Anne influence, built in 1889. Complex gable, hip and flat roofs covered with asphalt shingles, with corbiestep and tractable parapets containing three semi-circular arched 1/1 double-hung sashes. Facade features front and side projecting polygonal bays covered with flat roofs behind corbeled flat parapets. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes with flat brick arches, and a pair of 1/1 double-hung sashes with semi-circular fixed-sash transoms set in semi-circular arched reveals. Full-width, shed and gable-roofed porch with strap work in gable end, supported by wrought iron replacement posts. Two entrances each contain Queen Anne single-light, five-panel doors topped with single-light transoms.






    Circa 1896
    Henry Arrowsmith House
    1107 Church Street

    Two-story, three-bay, frame side hall townhouse with Queen Anne and Colonial Revival influences, built in 1896. Hip and gable roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice and closed gable end containing a Palladian arrangement of three 1/1 double-hung sashes with multilight top sashes and a single-light, semi-circular arched fixed sash casement. Facade features projecting polygonal bay above porch decorated with a garland frieze. Exterior walls covered with weatherboard on first floor level and square shingles on second floor level. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes and multi-light casement sashes. Partial-width, hip and gable-roofed porch supported by wrought iron replacement posts. Entrance and transom are covered with plywood.






    Circa 1898
    Henry Owen Stable
    816 North 11th Street

    One and one-half story, two-bay, brick masonry carriage house and quarters with Queen Anne influence, built in 1898. Hip, gable and shed roof covered with asphalt shingles, with molded eaves and shed dormer containing three multi-light casement sashes. Windows are 1/1 and 4// double-hung sashes set in segmental reveals. One equipment bay door contains a replacement overhead door in an elliptical-arched reveal; a second contains chevron-pattern bead board doors in an elliptical-arched reveal. Entrance contains a six-light, two-panel door. Formerly associated with 1027 Henry Street.






    Circa 1902
    John J. Williams House
    1107 Ridenbaugh Street

    Two-story, three-bay, brick veneer four square with Colonial Revival influence, built 1902. Hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice, deep overhanging eaves, and polygonal hip-roofed dormer containing a pair of 3/1 double-hung sashes. Facade features symmetrical polygonal bays above porch. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, and 1/1 double-hung sash cottage window. Full-width, flat-roofed porch supported by brick piers. Entrance contains an oval-light door set in a reveal with a corbeled lintel.






    1102 EDMOND STREET






    408 NORTH 11th STREET





    1 2 3 4 5

    Circa 1860
    Taylor Apartments
    425 North 11th Street

    This large Italianate rooming house at 425 North 11th Street was the residence of poet Eugene Field in 1875
    Two-story, five-bay, brick masonry center hall townhouse with Greek Revival and Italianate influences, built in 1860. Flat and hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with bracketed box cornice. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, with dressed-face ashlar lintels. Partial-width, flatroofed porch supported by replacement box piers. Entrance contains a two-light, two-panel door topped with a divided light transom and flanked by 1/2-length sidelights; a similar entrance opens to the roof of the porch.






    502-504 NORTH 11th STREET







    503 NORTH 11th STREET







    507 NORTH 11th STREET







    508 NORTH 11th STREET







    509-511 NORTH 11th STREET







    515 NORTH 11th STREET







    521-523 NORTH 11th STREET







    525 NORTH 11th STREET







    Circa 1910
    Rachel Matson House
    527 North 11th Street

    Rachel Matson House One and one-half story, three-bay, frame house with Queen Anne influence, built 1910. Complex side gable roof covered with asphalt shingles, with flared eaves, flared gable ends covered with square and diamond-pattern shingles containing two, 1/1 double-hung sashes, and pyramidal hiproofed dormer with flared eaves containing a 1/1 double-hung sashes. Exterior walls covered with weatherboard siding. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, and a 1/1 double-hung sash cottage window, partial-width, undercut porch supported by Doric columns. Entrance features a single-light, two-panel door topped with a single-light transom.






    604 NORTH 11th STREET







    605-607 NORTH 11th STREET







    609-611 NORTH 11th STREET







    610 NORTH 11th STREET







    611 NORTH 11th STREET







    714-716 NORTH 11th STREET







    1502 NORTH 11th STREET

    Doctor Toothaker Home






    1117 HENRY




    1 2 3

    1121 HENRY

    Photo #1 - Postcard photo submitted by Michael Miller




    1 2 3

    Alvina Schmitz House
    1014 FELIX STREET







    1102 FELIX STREET






    11th & FELIX STREET

    This building is at the top of Felix Street, just west of 11th Street
    The building no longer exists
    The building on the other side still exists

    Photo submitted by Michael Miller






    111-113 SOUTH 11th STREET






    202-204 SOUTH 11th STREET






    210 SOUTH 11th STREET




    1 2

    302 SOUTH 11th STREET






    310 SOUTH 11th STREET




    1 2 3 4 5 6

    401 SOUTH 11th STREET






    417-419 SOUTH 11th STREET






    418 SOUTH 11th STREET






    507 SOUTH 11th STREET






    517-519 SOUTH 11th STREET






    701 SOUTH 11th STREET




    1 2

    806-808 SOUTH 11th STREET






    906 SOUTH 11th STREET






    909 SOUTH 11th STREET






    910 SOUTH 11th STREET






    913 SOUTH 11th STREET






    916 SOUTH 11th STREET






    918 SOUTH 11th STREET






    919 SOUTH 11th STREET






    921 SOUTH 11th STREET






    922 SOUTH 11th STREET






    1002-1004 SOUTH 11th STREET






    1003 SOUTH 11th STREET






    1006-1008 SOUTH 11th STREET






    1007 SOUTH 11th STREET






    1009 SOUTH 11th STREET






    1010 SOUTH 11th STREET






    1011 SOUTH 11th STREET






    1015-1017 SOUTH 11th STREET






    1018 SOUTH 11th STREET




    1 2 3

    1615-1617 SOUTH 11th STREET




    1 2 3 4

    George Gleason Flats
    1018 FELIX STREET




    1 2 3

    1016-1018 SYLVANIE STREET




    1 2 3

    11th & SYLVANIE STREET






    11th & FELIX STREET






    11th & EDMOND STREET






    11th & EDMOND STREET




    1 2 3 4 5 6

    B. F. VINEYARD MANSION
    1125 CHARLES STREET






    Circa early 1900's
    11th & MESSANIE STREET



    12th STREET AREA





    3 bedroom duplex
    2422-2424 South 12th Street






    1107 South 12th Street






    1109 South 12th Street






    1219 Faraon






    1215 Faraon




    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15


    Circa 1888
    The Kelley Flats
    1208-1210-1212 Frederick Avenue
    Samuel Lima Furnished Rooms
    1208-1210-1212 Frederick Avenue
    Verdie Robertson Furnished Rooms
    1208-1210-1212 Frederick Avenue

    These town houses were built by Charles Kelley who was a partner in the real estate firm of Andrews and Kelley.
    He occupied the center section when the flats were first built.
    For a number of years, these were occupied by professionals, some of whom combined their offices with their residences.
    Before and after restoration photos - excellent restoration of both
    Although not visible from the street, these buildings have 3 stories




    1 2 3 4 5

    Circa 1889
    The Browne Flats
    1214-1216 Frederick
    Samuel Lima Home
    1214-1216 Frederick

    These town houses were erected by Francis Browne, who was an officer of Nave-McCord Wholesale Grocers. A native of Ireland he came to the United States in 1851, and to St. Joseph in 1857
    In early directories this tract is shown as his residence, but by time he constructed this building, he had built a mansion
    Francis Browne was a major benefactor of the Convent of the Sacrate Heart.
    The Browne Flats (1214-1216 Frederick Avenue ) The Browne Flats sit approximately three feet to the east of the Kelley Flats with the same streetscape setback. Again, due to the sloping terrain of the lot, the first-story facade of the Browne Flats is at street level with a full walkout basement at the rear. Like the Kelley Flats, the Browne Flats were originally built of red brick, but have been painted white, which has weathered badly. The two units of the Browne Flats are stepped in orientation and facade design. The facade entrances to both units are located in the center bay with a window above and flanked by a three-sided bay on the left and a two-sided bay on the right. The side of both bays contains a window on both stories
    The entrance to 1214 Frederick retains its historic shed roof hood. The entrance at 1216 Frederick does not. Access to the facade entrances in obtained by a non-historic concrete-slab platform and steps. Like the Kelley Flats, the Browne Flats feature simple corbelled brick string courses and a water table between stories. Unlike the Kelley Flats, the facade of the Browne Flats is divided by corbelled brick plaster on the second story.






    Circa 1890
    1221 Prospect Avenue

    House was altered in 1960
    Garage was added in 1910






    Circa 1870
    1222 Church Street

    Two-story, six-bay, frame I-house with no architectural influence, built in 1870, and altered in 1980. Side gable roof covered with asphalt shingles, with plain projecting eaves. Exterior walls covered with vinyl siding. Windows are 1/1 metal frame replacement sashes. Gable-front hood covers entrance, which contains a single-light replacement door.






    Circa 1898
    M. J. Donegan House
    903 North 12th Street

    Two and one-half story, four-bay, frame side hall townhouse variant with Queen Anne and Colonial Revival influences, built in 1898. Cross gable roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice, cornice returns, and gable ends with Palladian window arrangements, surrounded by square-pattern shingles and a bead board-pattern sunburst field. Exterior walls covered with weatherboard siding. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some in pairs or groups of three. Full-width, L-plan, hip-roofed porch supported by columns with Scamozzi capitals. Entrance contains a solid replacement door.






    Circa 1895
    George S. Karns House
    923 North 12th Street

    One-story, three-bay, frame shotgun with Queen Anne influence, built 1895. Hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice. Exterior walls covered with asphalt roll siding. Windows are 2/2 double-hung sashes. One-bay, side, undercut porch with a chevron-pattern, bead board frieze, supported by wrought iron replacement posts. Entrance contains a four-panel door topped with a single-light transom.






    Circa 1895
    Henry Puett House
    1223 Church Street

    Two-story, two-bay, brick masonry side hall townhouse with Queen Anne influence, built in 1895. Complex hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice, cornice gutters and corbeled modillion frieze. Facade features two-story, front and side projecting polygonal bays, windows contain 1/1 double-hung sashes with flat brick arches; one is topped with a semi-circular relieving arch with basket weave brick filler. One-bay, gable-front porch supported by chamfered posts, with closed gable end, modillion brackets and quarter-arch brackets with grid filler, and a replacement block spindle balustrade. Entrance contains a multi-panel replacement door.






    Circa 1887
    Charles Scheneker House
    524 North 12th Street

    Two-story, three-bay, brick masonry center hall townhouse with Italianate influence, built 1887. Complex hip and gable roof covered with asphalt shingles, with bracketed and dentil box cornice and frieze, cornice gutters, cornice returns, and gable end with roundel and keystone. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some in pairs, in segmental-arched reveals, some with corbeled brick and stone lintels with keystones and scroll sawn arch filler. One-bay, flat-roofed porch with dentil cornice and frieze supported by replacement box piers. Two entrances each contain a single-light replacement door, topped by an obscured transom.






    Circa 1900
    618 North 12th Street

    Two-story, three-bay, brick masonry townhouse with Queen Anne and Colonial Revival influences, built 1900. Flat roof covered with built-up asphalt roofing, with stepped parapet, dentil cornice and frieze. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some in pairs, hi flat and segmental-arched reveals, some with keystones; one has a gooseneck pediment with Ionic pilasters; and, one is a Palladian variation within an elliptical arch. Full-width, hip roofed porch supported by Doric columns on paneled bases with a segmental-arched frieze. Entrance contains a single-light door






    Circa 1880
    1224 Powell

    One-story, four-bay, brick masonry block and front wing cottage with Italianate influence, built ca. 1880. Flat and hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice. Windows are 2/2 double-hung sashes set in segmental reveals with scroll sawn arch filler. Side, partial depth, shed-roofed porch supported by wrought iron replacement posts. Entrance contains a three-light replacement door topped with a single-light transom




    1 2 3 4 5

    Circa 1889
    Rudolph Uhlman House
    518 North 12th






    703 North 12th






    12th & FELIX STREET

    Looking west on Felix Street between 12th & 13th Street

    Photo submitted by Michael Miller






    1213 ISADORE






    12th STREET






    1201-1203 Penn Street






    12th & EDMOND STREET






    12th & JULE STREET




    1 2

    Circa 1890
    Marshall B. Stroud house
    1201 Dewey Avenue

    This well maintained residence exhibits a combination of the Queen Anne and Shingle styles. Built in 1890 for Marshall Stroud, this residence features Queen Anne detailing and Shingle style form. The garage was built in 1910




    1 2

    Circa 1900
    Charles H. Nowland house
    1209 Dewey Avenue

    Altered in 1955



    13th STREET AREA





    1311 Mitchell Avenue






    1317 Mitchell Avenue






    1325-1327 Mitchell Avenue






    1322 Penn Street






    1310-1312 Penn Street






    1323 Faraon






    1321 Faraon






    1317 Faraon






    1315 Faraon






    1343-1345 Buchanan






    Circa 1894
    William Humphrey House
    1342-1344 Buchanan






    1340 Buchanan






    1339-1341 Buchanan






    1332-1334 Buchanan






    1331 Buchanan






    1330 Buchanan






    1329 Buchanan






    1325-1327 Buchanan






    1324-1326 Buchanan






    1321 Buchanan






    1320 Buchanan






    1319 Buchanan






    1317 Buchanan






    1314 Buchanan






    1312 Buchanan






    1307-1309 Buchanan






    1305 Buchanan






    1301 Buchanan






    Circa 1900
    416 North 13th Street






    414 North 13th Street






    Circa 1880
    Jesse James Home
    1318 Lafayette Street

    In November, 1881, Jessie James (alias Tom Howard), cattle buyer and his family appeared in St. Joseph. They spent two nights at the Patee House and then rented a house at 21st and Lafayette. On Christmas Eve 1881, the "Howard" family moved into the house at 1318 Lafayette, owned by Henrietta Saltzman, for which they paid $14 a month rent. There were in addition to Jesse and Zee, two children, Jesse Edwards and Mary Jones, in the family.

    For several reasons, it was decided it was not practical to place the house at 1318 Lafayette. First, it could never be in the original location, because the hill has been graded. Second, a 30-foot drop is now in the "back yard" and would be a hazardous area for visitors. Thirdly, the lot is still at the crest of a hill on a narrow street surrounded by private homes. It is not zoned for museum purposes, and there would be almost no on-street parking, and no place for off-street parking. For these reasons, it was decided to place the James Home on property adjoining the Patee House Museum. For those who want to see where the house originally stood, the Pony Express Historical Association has seeded the 1318 Lafayette site, and constructed a rustic fance across the back, making it into a private mini-park.






    Circa 1880
    515 North 13th Street

    One and one-half story, three-bay, frame gable-front cottage with Colonial Revival influence, built in 1880 and modified in 1910. Gable roof covered with asphalt shingles, with plain projecting eaves. Exterior walls covered with asbestos siding. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some with peaked lintels. Full-width, hip-roofed porch supported by Doric columns. Entrance contains a multi-light, single-panel door topped with a single-light transom.






    Circa 1913
    Dawson Brothers Grocery Store
    802 North 13th Street

    Two-story, two-bay, brick masonry commercial block with Colonial Revival influence, built 1913. Flat roof covered with built-up asphalt roofing, with plain parapet. Facade features a canted corner bay facing the street intersection. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes replacements with flat brick arches; some reveals have been filled. Street level features a storefront with display windows filled with exterior plywood and single-light fixed replacement sashes, transoms covered with plywood, and a single-light, eight panel replacement door. Attached garage, ca. 1995. One-story, one-bay, frame, gable roof, asphalt shingles, vinyl siding, overhead door.






    Circa 1899
    Mary C. Rumsey Duplex
    901-903 North 13th

    One-story, six-bay, double-shotgun with Queen Anne influence, built 1899. Complex gable and hip roof covered with asphalt shingles, with box cornice and closed gable ends. Exterior walls covered with asbestos shingles. Windows are 1/1 double-hung sashes, some in pairs. Two, one-bay, side, shed-roofed porches supported by turned posts. Two entrances each contain singlelight, three-panel doors with single-light transoms.






    628 South 13th Street






    13th & Edmond




    1 2

    110 South 13th Street




    1 2 3 4

    M. G. Glbert House
    217 South 13th Street






    619 SOUTH 13th STREET






    13th STREET near MESSANIE






    112 NORTH 13th STREEt






    13th & JULE STREET




    1 2

    Circa 1883
    Charles H. Nowland house
    1302 Dewey Avenue

    Charles Nowland, prominent contractor and builder, built this home for his family in 1883. This Classically-inspired version of the Queen Anne style retains much of its original design and exhibits a high degree of integrity.






    Circa 1910
    1323 Dewey



    14th STREET AREA





    1203 South 14th Street




    WENZ STORE
    On Left of Photo
    1421-1423 Penn Street
    RUDOLF PHARMACY
    On Right of Photo
    1505-1507 Penn Street




    1413 Penn Street




    1411 Penn Street




    1401 Penn Street




    Circa 1908
    Charles Nowland Speculative House #5
    1415 Prospect Avenue




    Circa 1904
    Selutias & Susie Cloud house
    1402 Dewey






    Circa 1910
    Garages in alley
    1402 & 1406 Dewey






    Circa 1899
    Basil B. Sullivan house
    1416 Dewey
    Circa 1900
    Frank Lacy house
    1418 Dewey

    Revisions made to the house in 1905, 1920 and 1922
    1416 Dewey on the left, 1418 Dewey on the right






    14th & FRANCIS STREET






    210-212 SOUTH 14th STREET






    14th & FELIX STREET

    Looking west of Felix Street from 14th Street
    The building in the center is now a restaurant

    Photo submitted by Michael Miller




    1 2 3

    1408-1410 Charles Street






    14th & SYLVANIE STREET




    1 2 3 4

    Circa 1887
    NUNNING MANSION
    1401 JULE STREET






    Circa 1904
    Selutias & Susie Cloud house
    1402 Dewey






    Circa 1910
    Garages in alley
    1402 & 1406 Dewey






    Circa 1899
    Basil B. Sullivan house
    1416 Dewey
    Circa 1900
    Frank Lacy house
    1418 Dewey

    Revisions made to the house in 1905, 1920 and 1922
    1416 Dewey on the left, 1418 Dewey on the right






    14th & FRANCIS STREET






    210-212 SOUTH 14th STREET






    14th & FELIX STREET

    Looking west of Felix Street from 14th Street
    The building in the center is now a restaurant

    Photo submitted by Michael Miller




    1 2 3

    1408-1410 Charles Street






    14th & SYLVANIE STREET



    15th STREET AREA



    1 2

    1121 South 15th Street






    Circa 1898
    M. Haskel House
    1525 Faraon Street

    Two and one half story frame dwelling built in the late Queen Anne style. Built in 1898 for M. Haskel, irregular plan with combination hip and gable roofline, prominent gabled wall dormer on the facade. Dual entry, one of which is at reetrant angle of the main facade wing and a chamfer shaped wing on the east elevation, broad eaves, porch fills half of the facade and curves around the reentrant angle on the east elevation until meeting with the projected wing. Porch has pediment over the entry with sunburst motif. Round wood columnar support with Tuscan capitals, modern siding




    1 2

    Circa 1889
    1522-1524 Faraon Street

    Two story brick duplex building in the Queen Anne style, built in 1889. Basic rectangle plan with flat roof behind a facade parapet projected metal cornice with corbeled brick patterning beneath. From the facade there projects a broad wing at the reentrant angles at either building corner there are small porches with modern support over the unit entrys. From the wing project the mirror image bays with paired window rising to gable pediments on the roof parapet, There are broad cornice brackets at either gable corner and the cornice pattern is carried around the pediment. Window and door openings have segmental shape with shallow projected labeled lintels. Jig sawn inserts in the segmental area above the window sash






    Circa 1885/1893 (Altered)
    Thomas P. Gordon
    1519 Faraon Street

    Single story frame dwelling in the Queen Anne style, built at an earlier date but given it's present appearance in a remodeling of 1893 done for Thomas P. Gordon, a livestock commission merchant who had earlier lived at the building to the west. Irregular plan shape with truncated hip roofline. Gable dormer with diamond window centered over the principal facade. Slightly projected wing with chamfer shape beneath the cornice. Modern porch and modern siding






    Circa 1915
    1518-1520 Faraon Street

    Two story frame duplex covered with stucco and bui1t in 1915. Rectang1e shape with hip roof and with hip roof dormer on the facade roof face. Full two story porch on sqare wood posts. Centered entrance at either story under the porch with craftsman patterned doors and sidelights.






    Circa 1915
    1514-1516 Faraon Street

    Two story frame duplex covered with stucco and bui1t in 1915. Rectang1e shape with hip roof and with hip roof dormer on the facade roof face. Full two story porch on sqare wood posts. Centered entrance at either story under the porch with craftsman patterned doors and sidelights.






    Circa 1888
    Thomas Gordon House
    1513-1515 Faraon Street

    Two story frame duplex built in the Queen Anne style, built in 1888 for Thomas Gordon, a Livestock Commission Merchant. Irregular plan shape with truncated hip roof plan. Fishscale shingle belt course seperates the storys below of which the corners are chamfered with drop pendant soffits. Spindles freize on the porches which fill the reentrant angles at either building corner over the unit entry. Centered door on the facade is modern






    Circa 1917
    N. M. Parker House
    1512 Faraon Street

    One and one half story frame dwelling built in 1917 for N. H. Parker, attorney. Basic square plan shape with hip roof from which projects a primary facade wing with a gable roof whose pediment is covered with sawtooth shingle work. Broad projected eaves. Full porch across the wing with broad Frieze and supported on tall round wood columns with Tuscan capitals. Lap Siding






    Circa 1901
    L. D. Ransom House
    1511-1511½ Faraon Street

    Two story rectangle shaped building with no stylistic ascription. Built in 1901 for L.D. Ransom, a real estate broker as a speculative venture. Street facing gable roofline with overrhanging eaves, symmetrical two bay facade with both sidelighted unit entries at the first story. Full porch supported on round wood columns with Tuscan capitals resting on tall brick piers, modern siding






    Circa 1942
    W. T. Kessels House
    1510 Faraon Street

    One and one half story brick veneered dwelling built in simplified cottage revival style for W. T. Kessels in 1942. Rectangle plan shape with a sun parlor wing with intersecting gable on the east elevation. Chamfer shaped oriel in the half story, projected gable in gable entry vestibule with butresses and stone quoining






    Circa 1900
    1509 Faraon Street

    Two story frame dwelling built in 1900 with vogue Queen Anne detailing. Gable to street with overhanging eaves and rectangle shape. The pediment area is covered with fishscale shinglework. Full porch on mOdern supports, projected first story bay window centered on the facade with paired window opening






    Circa 1890
    William Jamieson
    1507 Faraon Street

    Two story rectangle shaped dwelling built in two stages. The ear1iest dates to 1875, but is obscured by a 1890 addition made by William Jamieson, an engineer at the Nunning's Brewery, gable to the street with overhanging eave line, single bay facade with full porch which continues around the west elevation joining with a rear porch supported on round wood columns with Tuscan capitals






    Circa 1889
    Mrs Caleigne House
    1501-1503 Faraon

    Two story Queen Anne duplex built in 1889 for Mrs, Co1eigne, rectangle plan slope with flat roof behind the parapeted facade Mansard, Mirror image units with side entry. Slightly projected wings dominate the facade rising to highly decorative gables with centered pendants and broad bossed cornice frieze and fishscale shinglework, The porch dates to 1910 and is continuous across the facade supported on wood pylons resting on brick piers.






    Circa 1902
    Albert Collins House
    1524 Buchanan






    Circa 1888
    Winnie Long House
    1522 Buchanan






    1515 Buchanan






    Circa 1889
    E. M. Tracy House
    1504-1506 Buchanan






    421 North 15th Street






    417-419 North 15th Street






    Circa 1906
    323 North 15th Street






    Circa 1909
    321 North 15th Street






    1523 Jules Street






    1519-1521 Edmond Street






    1523-1529 Edmond Street






    1521 Charles Street




    1 2 3 4 5

    Rufus K Allen House
    305 South 15th




    1 2

    311 South 15th






    15th & JULE STREET




    1 2

    120 South 15th Street



    15th STREET AREA





    Circa 1912
    N. J. Nesser House
    1524 Jules Street

    Twa story frome dwelling built with a 'Foursquare' plan constructed in 1912 by N.J. Nesser, a speculative builder who did not reside at ~his address. The house varies from the neighbor, also built by Nesser, only in the porch detail. Square plan shape with hip roof and prominent gabled dormer on the facade with centered windOW. Full porch with hip roof supported on squat brick pillars with a geometric pattern worked into the masonry. On the east elevation is a shallow chamfer shaped bay windaw. The gable is covered with fishscale shingle. The house has lap siding.






    Circa 1898
    J. Will Gray House
    1523 Jules Street

    One and one half story frame dwelling in the Queen Anne style built in 1898 for J. Will Gray, a salesman for T & W Dry Goods Co. Irregular plan with a combination hip and gable roof plan. Prominent facade gable with decorative shingle work in the pediment with a bullseye vent above a palladian window, Porch fills the reentrant angle entry with a low gable and pediment covered with plaster decoration with the letter "G" worked into the center. Dentil cornice. Round wood columns with Tuscan capitals support porch on the east is a prominent wing with a centered ovoid bullseye window.






    Circa 1912
    N. J. Nesser House
    1522 Jules Street

    Two story frame dwelling built with a ' Fo u r s q u a r e ' plan constructed in 1912 by N.J. Nesser, a speculative builder who did not reside at this address. The house varies from the neighbor at 1524, also built by Nesser, only in the porch detail. Square plan shape with hip roof and prominent gabled dormer on the facade with centered window, Full porch with street facing gable roof supported on squat brick pillars. On the east elevation is a shallow chamfer shaped bay window. The gable and house are covered with modern siding.






    Circa 1901
    Mrs Magnolia Carder House
    1519 Jules Street

    This is one of three identical houses built in 1901 for Mrs. Magnolia Carder. Each is built with a 'Foursquare' plan with rectangle shape and hip roof plan with hip roof dormer with paired window each with upper sash with diamond patterned muntin. The face of each dormer is stucco covered. Broad projected eaves with dentil patterned cornice. Lap siding, full porch with hip roof supported by round wood columns with Tuscan capitals. Each of the three first story bays have transoms.






    Circa 1901
    Mrs Magnolia Carder House
    1517 Jules Street

    This is one of three identical houses built in 1901 for Mrs. Magnolia Carder. Each is built with a 'Foursquare' plan with rectangle shape and hip roof plan with hip roof dormer with paired window each with upper sash with diamond patterned muntin. The face of each dormer is stucco covered. Broad projected eaves with dentil patterned cornice. Lap siding, full porch with hip roof supported by round wood columns with Tuscan capitals. Each of the three first story bays have transoms.






    Circa 1901
    Mrs Magnolia Carder House
    1515 Jules Street

    This is one of three identical houses built in 1901 for Mrs. Magnolia Carder. Each is built with a 'Foursquare' plan with rectangle shape and hip roof plan with hip roof dormer with paired window each with upper sash with diamond patterned muntin. The face of each dormer is stucco covered, broad projected eaves with dentil patterned cornice. Lap siding, full porch with hip roof supported by round wood columns with Tuscan capitals. Each of the three first story bays have transoms.






    Circa 1917
    N. M. House
    1512 Jules Street

    Two story frame dwelling built in 1917 for N. H. Parker, attorney. 'Foursquare' plan shape with hip roof and hip roof dormer. Full porch across the facade wirh streer facing gable resting on modern iron supports in turn supported by brick piers. On the east is a modern appendage.






    Circa 1898
    M. Haskel House
    1525 Faraon Street

    Two and one half story frame dwelling built in the late Queen Anne style. Built in 1898 for M. Haskel, irregular plan with combination hip and gable roofline, prominent gabled wall dormer on the facade. Dual entry, one of which is at reetrant angle of the main facade wing and a chamfer shaped wing on the east elevation, broad eaves, porch fills half of the facade and curves around the reentrant angle on the east elevation until meeting with the projected wing. Porch has pediment over the entry with sunburst motif. Round wood columnar support with Tuscan capitals, modern siding




    1 2

    Circa 1889
    1522-1524 Faraon Street

    Two story brick duplex building in the Queen Anne style, built in 1889. Basic rectangle plan with flat roof behind a facade parapet projected metal cornice with corbeled brick patterning beneath. From the facade there projects a broad wing at the reentrant angles at either building corner there are small porches with modern support over the unit entrys. From the wing project the mirror image bays with paired window rising to gable pediments on the roof parapet, There are broad cornice brackets at either gable corner and the cornice pattern is carried around the pediment. Window and door openings have segmental shape with shallow projected labeled lintels. Jig sawn inserts in the segmental area above the window sash






    Circa 1885/1893 (Altered)
    Thomas P. Gordon
    1519 Faraon Street

    Single story frame dwelling in the Queen Anne style, built at an earlier date but given it's present appearance in a remodeling of 1893 done for Thomas P. Gordon, a livestock commission merchant who had earlier lived at the building to the west. Irregular plan shape with truncated hip roofline. Gable dormer with diamond window centered over the principal facade. Slightly projected wing with chamfer shape beneath the cornice. Modern porch and modern siding






    Circa 1915
    1518-1520 Faraon Street

    Two story frame duplex covered with stucco and bui1t in 1915. Rectang1e shape with hip roof and with hip roof dormer on the facade roof face. Full two story porch on sqare wood posts. Centered entrance at either story under the porch with craftsman patterned doors and sidelights.






    Circa 1915
    1514-1516 Faraon Street

    Two story frame duplex covered with stucco and bui1t in 1915. Rectang1e shape with hip roof and with hip roof dormer on the facade roof face. Full two story porch on sqare wood posts. Centered entrance at either story under the porch with craftsman patterned doors and sidelights.






    Circa 1888
    Thomas Gordon House
    1513-1515 Faraon Street

    Two story frame duplex built in the Queen Anne style, built in 1888 for Thomas Gordon, a Livestock Commission Merchant. Irregular plan shape with truncated hip roof plan. Fishscale shingle belt course seperates the storys below of which the corners are chamfered with drop pendant soffits. Spindles freize on the porches which fill the reentrant angles at either building corner over the unit entry. Centered door on the facade is modern






    Circa 1917
    N. M. Parker House
    1512 Faraon Street

    One and one half story frame dwelling built in 1917 for N. H. Parker, attorney. Basic square plan shape with hip roof from which projects a primary facade wing with a gable roof whose pediment is covered with sawtooth shingle work. Broad projected eaves. Full porch across the wing with broad Frieze and supported on tall round wood columns with Tuscan capitals. Lap Siding






    Circa 1901
    L. D. Ransom House
    1511-1511½ Faraon Street

    Two story rectangle shaped building with no stylistic ascription. Built in 1901 for L.D. Ransom, a real estate broker as a speculative venture. Street facing gable roofline with overrhanging eaves, symmetrical two bay facade with both sidelighted unit entries at the first story. Full porch supported on round wood columns with Tuscan capitals resting on tall brick piers, modern siding






    Circa 1942
    W. T. Kessels House
    1510 Faraon Street

    One and one half story brick veneered dwelling built in simplified cottage revival style for W. T. Kessels in 1942. Rectangle plan shape with a sun parlor wing with intersecting gable on the east elevation. Chamfer shaped oriel in the half story, projected gable in gable entry vestibule with butresses and stone quoining






    Circa 1900
    1509 Faraon Street

    Two story frame dwelling built in 1900 with vogue Queen Anne detailing. Gable to street with overhanging eaves and rectangle shape. The pediment area is covered with fishscale shinglework. Full porch on mOdern supports, projected first story bay window centered on the facade with paired window opening






    Circa 1890
    William Jamieson
    1507 Faraon Street

    Two story rectangle shaped dwelling built in two stages. The ear1iest dates to 1875, but is obscured by a 1890 addition made by William Jamieson, an engineer at the Nunning's Brewery, gable to the street with overhanging eave line, single bay facade with full porch which continues around the west elevation joining with a rear porch supported on round wood columns with Tuscan capitals






    Circa 1889
    Mrs Caleigne House
    1501-1503 Faraon

    Two story Queen Anne duplex built in 1889 for Mrs, Co1eigne, rectangle plan slope with flat roof behind the parapeted facade Mansard, Mirror image units with side entry. Slightly projected wings dominate the facade rising to highly decorative gables with centered pendants and broad bossed cornice frieze and fishscale shinglework, The porch dates to 1910 and is continuous across the facade supported on wood pylons resting on brick piers.






    Circa 1902
    Albert Collins House
    1524 Buchanan






    Circa 1888
    Winnie Long House
    1522 Buchanan






    1515 Buchanan






    Circa 1889
    E. M. Tracy House
    1504-1506 Buchanan






    421 North 15th Street






    417-419 North 15th Street






    Circa 1906
    323 North 15th Street






    Circa 1909
    321 North 15th Street






    1523 Jules Street






    1519-1521 Edmond Street






    1523-1529 Edmond Street






    1521 Charles Street




    1 2 3 4 5

    Rufus K Allen House
    305 South 15th




    1 2

    311 South 15th






    15th & JULE STREET




    1 2

    120 South 15th Street




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    Rick Drozd rickdrozd@gmail.com


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